What is your potential?
April 8, 2011

Try to imagine your real potential. No doubt you have a goal weight in mind, thinking you need to lose around 10 or 15 lbs. Realistically, in most cases that is just the beginning! One can take for granted how overweight one has become. Of course losing 15 lbs is going to reduce your health risks and make you feel years younger. Nonetheless, if you are serious about your body and your health, you might want to think about doubling those numbers.

Remember, the amount of exercise and willingness to stick to a balanced diet is in direct relation to results. There are no quick fixes! If you have failed to see any results until now, you are not committed enough.

If you refuse to turn your back on most of your eating vices, then I am sorry, you are not ready! Sure, there will be times when you can indulge yourself, but if your life revolves around unhealthy food, it will be impossible to break the cycle.

You have it in you to succeed, everyone does. You simply need to decide that you have had enough, and your healthy life starts now! Just imagine your potential.

*Photo provided by Flickr user: Niklas Morberg


They have… We have
November 12, 2010

For this week’s post, a more entertaining approach was taken; one that hopefully encourages us to think twice about what we put in our bodies. Please keep in mind that the following comparisons are made in good fun and not to be taken too seriously. Instead, think of it as a kindly reminder that our habits may have gone a little astray.

There is much to learn from other cultures that have had a healthy relationship with food for years. Europe is often a good example but no doubt there are others as well. Just how different are their habits from ours?

They have…


Whether it’s morning or afternoon, these costly machines serve non-stop espresso and espresso based drinks like cappuccinos and lattes, providing Europeans with their daily dose of caffeine.

We have…


Free refills for everyone! Coke, Pepsi, Sprite… you name it. This self-serve fountain machine supplies us caffeine and sugar to no end.

They have…


This flakey piece of heaven might be loaded with butter but a croissant is primarily all-natural goodness, a satisfying way many Europeans start their day. Other than natural sugars in the milk, there is only a small quantity of added sugar, just enough to activate the yeast.

We have…


This sinful monster wreaks havoc on your insulin levels. These eye-popping donuts send signals straight to your brain and later to your fat cells, saying “this guy wants to store some fat”; not to mention the hydrogenated oils, high fructose corn syrup and processed white flour. DO-NUT make these a habit!

They have…


Gelato is typically made with milk (some with water) which differs from cream based North American ice cream. With less sugar and up to four and a half times less fat, Gelato is the healthier version of ice cream. Try it and you will be pleasantly surprised how the fruit and berry flavours hit your palate.

We have…


When young and old consumers demand more fat and sugar concentrated flavours, this ice cream delivers. A ½ cup contains 22 grams of carbs (18 from sugar), and 9 grams total fat (6 saturated). You better not even think of finishing this tub in one sitting. At least put it back in the freezer for after your next meal.

They have…


This latte is actually on the larger side of most coffees served in Italy or France, while many opt for an itsy bitsy cup of espresso. If the espresso beans are delicately roasted, ground on the spot to the perfect consistency, nicely dosed, carefully groomed, tamped with the correct amount of pressure, evenly extracted under just the right temperature (using ice-cold filtered water), then crema-laden espresso will ooze out from your portafilter rewarding you with a sweet slightly acidic espresso, to which there is no need to add any sugar or milk. How’s that for getting your caffeine fix with virtually no extra calories?

We have…


Sure, we North Americans think we have a little slice of Italy now that Starbucks has taken over. However, there is something disturbing about the fact we can’t say no when they offer to smother our coffee with a mountain of wiped cream. If you order it hot, it’s up to 20 oz’s, but if you opt for a cold drink, surprise, you can have a whopping 30 oz cardboard goblet. This is great for you moms, because when you are done with it, your kids can cut out a door and windows and play house.

They have…


Wine is the perfect accompaniment to your meal. Swish your wonderfully aged wine of choice around your tongue coating your palette. You taste a bouquet of undergrowth, cherry pit and soft spices. The mouth, graced with ripe red fruit and woody notes, features great freshness and solid tannins. It can go perfectly with duck and mushroom ravioli or thyme rack of lamb.* Wine is the lifeblood of Europeans; cut them and they will bleed grape juices.

We have…


What is the beverage of choice to accompany a typical North American meal? It would have to be a soft drink! It’s perfect for cleansing the palate after fried chicken, a greasy hamburger or deep-fried french fries. A 44 oz Super Big Gulp is everyone’s ticket to high blood sugar and lifelong diabetes. Still thirsty? No worries, ask for his big brother the Double Gulp; he will grace you with a full 64 oz insulin spike. Good to know they also offer discounted refills!

They have…


The veil has been lifted on misconceptions about healthy fats. Finally olive oil is getting the recognition it truly deserves. Should not the fact that Europeans have been using it for thousands of years been a clue that it’s not all that bad for us? If any food could be labelled as a jack-of-all-trades, it would be olive oil. Cook, bake, fry, sprinkle, or pour it on many European inspired dishes to bring out wonderful rich flavours. In their kitchens, the back of restaurants and on their terrace tables, olive oil is a staple.

We have…


That’s right; it’s stocked in our cupboards, sitting in the refrigerator door, and at close reach in many restaurants. Our own jack-of-all-trades is good old Heinz Ketchup. This can be spooned, plopped, hit out from the bottom of an old-school glass bottle, squeezed and squirted onto almost any North American food. Thank goodness they make it in travel size to-go packets, because how would one ever go without. Deep-fried food just wouldn’t taste the same without it!

Depending how you came across this post, you can either submit your own comparisons by way of the “Leave a Response” link at the top of this post or “Submit a Comment” below. Come up with an amusing comparison of your own, and I just might add it to this post.

Help put our unhealthy stereotypes behind us. Eat better starting now!

*Quote provided by SAQ

1. “Espresso Machine” photo provided by Rancilio

2. “Fountain Machine” photo provided by Lancer

3. “Croissant” photo provided by Flickr user: alicehou

4. “Donut” photo provided by Flickr user: simon seljeflot

5. “Gelato” photo provided by Flickr user: su-lin

6. “Rolo Ice Cream” photo provided by Nestlé Canada

7. “Latte” photo provided by Flickr user: Kyle Johnson

8. “Starbucks” photo provided by Cake & Carrots

9. “Wine” photo provided by TripAdvisor

10. “Big Gulp” photo provided by Flickr user: Katrina Lou Samsin

11. “Olive Oil” photo provided by Health

12. “Heinz Ketchup” photo provided by Global Package Gallery


Who have I become?
February 9, 2010

I seem to be averaging around 155 lbs now, and I find this to be a comfortable weight. I started off on a very restrictive low carb diet and lost 50 lbs in about 8 months. The diet proved to be so effective that I lost all the weight without any additional exercise.

Of course, changing your eating and exercise habits together is the best way to lose and keep the weight off. Still, my example proves that if you change your eating habits enough, you are well on the way to success… even if you are having trouble instituting an exercise program.

For those of you who are obese and thinking “Yeah that’s easy for him to say he only had to lose 50 lbs. What about me? 50 lbs won’t even make a dent!” You might not think so, but losing 100 lbs or more is the same as losing 50 lbs, the only difference is time. What I did in 8 months might take you one or two years, but your plan of action will be the same.

I would recommend a low carb diet to someone who finds himself or herself in an unhealthy, high-risk lifestyle. It’s amazing how fast someone can lose weight if they follow one properly. What’s the catch you ask? Well, it doesn’t work for everyone and low carb is strictly for short-term use only. Although you experience rapid progress, your food options are very limited, and there is a good chance you will lose muscle along with fat. You can have success at home but will find it very difficult to stick to your diet on the road, with friends and family, and at the restaurant.

This brings up a very valid point as far as balanced diets go. If your new eating habits are so foreign to you, how long do you think you can keep it up before returning to your old habits?

In total, I balanced a low carb diet for about 6 years and experienced big fluctuations in my weight. For example anywhere from 150 lbs to 175 lbs in very short periods of time. This was basically the result of getting on the wagon and falling off the wagon over and over again.

It all changed for the better when I took the leap into a balanced diet. I immediately experienced more freedom in food selection and found my weight to be more stable. I can honestly say that in no way do I feel restricted, or like I am missing out on anything.


*Photo provided by Microsoft Office Online Clip Art


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