What is your potential?
April 8, 2011

Try to imagine your real potential. No doubt you have a goal weight in mind, thinking you need to lose around 10 or 15 lbs. Realistically, in most cases that is just the beginning! One can take for granted how overweight one has become. Of course losing 15 lbs is going to reduce your health risks and make you feel years younger. Nonetheless, if you are serious about your body and your health, you might want to think about doubling those numbers.

Remember, the amount of exercise and willingness to stick to a balanced diet is in direct relation to results. There are no quick fixes! If you have failed to see any results until now, you are not committed enough.

If you refuse to turn your back on most of your eating vices, then I am sorry, you are not ready! Sure, there will be times when you can indulge yourself, but if your life revolves around unhealthy food, it will be impossible to break the cycle.

You have it in you to succeed, everyone does. You simply need to decide that you have had enough, and your healthy life starts now! Just imagine your potential.

*Photo provided by Flickr user: Niklas Morberg


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Not convinced?
February 6, 2011

This might encourage you to pick up some weights!

“It turns out that while lifters didn’t burn as many calories during their workouts as the folks who ran or biked, they burned far more calories over the course of the next several hours. This phenomenon is known as the afterburn–the additional calories your body burns off in the hours and days after a workout. When researchers looked at the metabolic increases after exercise, they found that the increased metabolic effects of aerobics lasted only 30 to 60 minutes. The effects of weight training lasted as long as 48 hours. That’s 48 hours during which the body was burning additional fat. Over the long term, both groups lost weight, but those who practiced strength training lost only fat, while the runners and bikers lost muscle mass as well. The message: Aerobic exercise essentially burns only at the time of the workout. Strength training burns calories long after you leave the gym, while you sleep, and maybe all the way until your next workout. Plus, the extra muscle you build through strength training means that in the long term, your body keeps burning calories at rest just to keep that new muscle alive.

That raises a question. What aspect of strength training creates the long afterburn? Most likely, it’s the process of muscle repair. Weight lifting causes your muscle tissues to break down and rebuild themselves at a higher rate than normal. (Muscles are always breaking down and rebuilding; strength training simply accelerates the process.)” The Abs Diet

*Photo provided by Women’s Health article: Cardio vs Strength-Training


Read… Read… Read…
January 4, 2011

Do you read the labels? Start reading the nutrition facts; you will be shocked at what you have been putting into your body.

Here is the basic label:

You will quickly see the differences between packaged processed foods and foods close to their natural state. If foods grow on a tree or come out of the ground, then eat them. These types of food are more nutrient dense, therefore helping you to feel full with fewer calories.

The ingredient list is just as important to read! Remember ingredients are listed in order of quantity; the first ingredient represents the highest quantity and so on. If you want to be in control of your weight, you must become familiar with food labels.

*Photo provided by Stew-Art-Prints


Simple Humans
December 24, 2010

Humans thrive on accomplishment, which is why we usually only succeed if we see progressive results. The gym provides an environment that encourages us to compete with ourselves. If we take the time to document our progress, we can keep track of our accomplishments.

If you have been stuck at a certain weight for a while, it is no doubt discouraging. You may quickly reason “all this work is not worth it”. However, after a few visits to the gym, suddenly your regular weights seem lighter than usual. Words cannot describe your excitement as you progress while your body becomes stronger. Taking your measurements can also prove encouraging, since there will be times when you stop losing on the scale, but keep losing in inches.

Strength training provides both an obstacle and a goal. What seems to be impossible at first may quickly become manageable in the near future. Once you look back and see how far your body has come, you are sure to get the satisfaction you need to carry on.

Humans are simple; we need to see results to succeed. So dig deep! Push mentally! Strain physically! SURPRISE YOURSELF! SUCCEED!

*Photo provided by Home-Gym-Bodybuilding


When are we going to grow up?
November 16, 2010

All of us at one time or another have been on the receiving end of that comment. “When are you going to grow up?” Shocked as we may have been, there is a good chance there was a little truth behind the statement. Yes, the truth does hurt! Ironically, the same can be said about millions who struggle with their weight.

Much like a child who objects to his parent’s suggestions, even adults at times make up less than reasonable excuses.

Suggestion: “Maybe you could read up on fitness and nutrition to help you get motivated!”

Answer: “Oh, I don’t like reading!”

Suggestion: “Okay just try to increase your vegetable consumption.”

Answer: “I hate vegetables!”

Suggestion: “You could take a few minutes each day to walk.”

Answer: “Walking is too boring!”

Suggestion: “How about the gym? It can be more exciting than walking.”

Answer: “I’m too busy to go to the gym!”

Sound familiar? Just to make sure, we all know kindergarten is long gone? Playing games and eating goodies all day long is far behind us, and we just might be faced with some less than enjoyable responsibilities from time to time.

It would do us all some good to abandon the belief that our cravings should be constantly satisfied. In reality, most of us eat like kings! We are completely surrounded by whatever our taste buds desire, and have become accustomed to saying: “You deserve it!” Although what we really deserve, is healthy food to build a healthy body.

Since when has sitting on the couch and pigging out become rewarding physically and mentally? As a culture we are seriously confused as to what classifies as rewarding one self. It is time to grow up and stop making excuses, we deserve better and so does our body!

*Photo provided by Microsoft Office Online Clip Art


Reevaluation needed?
October 15, 2010

Some researchers believe there are many benefits to eating specific fruits according to their respective season, arguing that our body is not designed to ingest certain fruits all year-round. For example, some fruits eaten out of season block your body’s ability to metabolize vitamin D. So during winter, when the sun (just one source of vitamin D for humans) is minimal, we would not be getting an adequate amount of vitamin D.

Do not get me wrong here, that could be a well-founded argument if you are prone to any vitamin deficiencies. More importantly, what poses a bigger health risk: your levels of vitamin D or being overweight?

Also, since we do not have all the time and energy in the world, where do you want to spend it?

One can easily get caught up in continually changing opinions. Fun facts might make you seem knowledgeable around your friends, but why not accept practical suggestions, ones that yield the most results. The proof is in the pudding, so to speak. This is what matters most and changes ones life for the better. Start simple and work your way up, you can always fine tune later. If a few years from now you find yourself slim and trim, and maintaining your weight has become second nature, then by all means incorporate other suggestions.

Please keep things in perspective! If you find yourself worrying about your vitamin levels and passing by fruits because they are not in season, but are still throwing chips and cookies into your groceries cart, then maybe it is time for a reevaluation! First things first… let us start worrying more about loosing some weight (fat).

*Photo provided by Microsoft Office Online Clip Art


The perfect balance!
July 11, 2010



For those of you who are into numbers and are not intimidated by a little bit of math, the perfect balance is 40% carbohydrates, 30% protein and 30% fat. Your height and body fat percentage is also taken into consideration to calculate your daily caloric needs.







Here are what my numbers look like;



*These values are based on a meal plan consisting of five meals a day.

If you are interested in what your numbers would be, based on your specific needs, send me a request via the “Leave a Response” link at the top of this entry or “Submit a Comment” below. I will be happy to crunch the numbers for you. To do so I will need the following information: your height, weight and body fat percentage. Use this Body Fat Test to calculate your body fat percentage.


*Photo provided by BodyLogicMD’s Hormone Therapy Blog


Who have I become?
February 9, 2010

I seem to be averaging around 155 lbs now, and I find this to be a comfortable weight. I started off on a very restrictive low carb diet and lost 50 lbs in about 8 months. The diet proved to be so effective that I lost all the weight without any additional exercise.

Of course, changing your eating and exercise habits together is the best way to lose and keep the weight off. Still, my example proves that if you change your eating habits enough, you are well on the way to success… even if you are having trouble instituting an exercise program.

For those of you who are obese and thinking “Yeah that’s easy for him to say he only had to lose 50 lbs. What about me? 50 lbs won’t even make a dent!” You might not think so, but losing 100 lbs or more is the same as losing 50 lbs, the only difference is time. What I did in 8 months might take you one or two years, but your plan of action will be the same.

I would recommend a low carb diet to someone who finds himself or herself in an unhealthy, high-risk lifestyle. It’s amazing how fast someone can lose weight if they follow one properly. What’s the catch you ask? Well, it doesn’t work for everyone and low carb is strictly for short-term use only. Although you experience rapid progress, your food options are very limited, and there is a good chance you will lose muscle along with fat. You can have success at home but will find it very difficult to stick to your diet on the road, with friends and family, and at the restaurant.

This brings up a very valid point as far as balanced diets go. If your new eating habits are so foreign to you, how long do you think you can keep it up before returning to your old habits?

In total, I balanced a low carb diet for about 6 years and experienced big fluctuations in my weight. For example anywhere from 150 lbs to 175 lbs in very short periods of time. This was basically the result of getting on the wagon and falling off the wagon over and over again.

It all changed for the better when I took the leap into a balanced diet. I immediately experienced more freedom in food selection and found my weight to be more stable. I can honestly say that in no way do I feel restricted, or like I am missing out on anything.


*Photo provided by Microsoft Office Online Clip Art


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